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Items of interest to beekeepers March 4 2017 – Canadian Honey Council

Items of interest to beekeepers March 4 2017

Supplied by Fran Bach Editor of both WAS and Washington State Beekeepers newsletters

IN THIS ISSUE

BIG NEWS ON LOWER PRICED EPINEPHRINE AUTO-INJECTOR PENS
BALL-ROLLING BEES REVEAL COMPLEX LEARNING
CALGARY HONEY COMPETITION INVITATION – DEADLINE APRIL 1
RESEARCH JOBS LIST
CATCH THE BUZZ
EVENTS
LINKS

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From the California State Beekeepers News Update –

BIG NEWS ON LOWER PRICED EPINEPHRINE AUTO-INJECTOR PENS
By Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. on Feb 6, 2017

The band Berlin hit the charts with “Take My Breath Away” in 1986, a year before the first epinephrine auto-injector was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. That device was a game-changer, protecting people at risk for life-threatening anaphylactic reactions, which actually do take your breath away by causing a swollen throat and tongue, respiratory distress, edema and low blood pressure. They can happen from contact with an allergen such as peanuts, insect bites or chemicals, like latex.

In 2007, Mylan acquired the right to sell EpiPen, the brand-name epinephrine auto-injector. Since 2007, the price for a two-pack went from $93.88 to $608.61. NBC news reports that it costs Mylan about $35!

Thankfully, you can lower the cost. However, to obtain a lower-priced, generic EpiPen your doctor must write you a prescription for an “epinephrine auto-injector,” NOT “EpiPen.” Also, not all discount coupons deliver what they imply (up to 75 percent off), so ask what your rate will be, and know that Mylan’s My EpiPen Savings Card has restrictions.

So, what discounts are available? CVS offers a generic two-pack for under $100; discount coupons are available online from national drugstore chains and places like GoodRx.com. Just Google “EpiPen discounts.” For the brand version: Walgreens, RiteAid and others offer EpiPen two-packs for around $200. Then there’s Auvi-Q. The EpiPen alternative hits shelves this month — free to folks with commercial insurance or with no insurance in households earning less than $100,000. Will insurers and pharmacy benefit managers go along with the plan? We’ll see. And there’s Mylan’s discount: a two-pack for $300.

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic.

https://www.arcamax.com/healthandspirit/health/youdocs/s-1923184

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From California’s Morning AgClips –

BALL-ROLLING BEES REVEAL COMPLEX LEARNING

Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London, England.

Their study, published in the journal Science, suggests that species whose lifestyle demands advanced learning abilities could learn entirely new behaviors if there is ecological pressure.

“Our study puts the final nail in the coffin of the idea that small brains constrain insects to have limited behavioral flexibility and only simple learning abilities,” said Professor Lars Chittka from QMUL’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. Chittka is the project supervisor and co-author.

Previous research has shown that bumblebees could solve a range of cognitive tasks, but these have so far resembled tasks similar to the bees’ natural foraging routines, such as pulling strings to obtain food.

This study examines bees’ behavioral flexibility to carry out tasks that are not naturally encountered by the insects.

“We wanted to explore the cognitive limits of bumblebees by testing whether they could use a non-natural object in a task likely never encountered before by any individual in the evolutionary history of bees,” said Dr. Clint Perry, joint lead author and also from QMUL’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

The experiment required the bees to move a ball to a specified location to obtain a reward of food. The insects were first trained to know the correct location of the ball on a platform. Subsequently, to obtain their reward, the bees had to move a displaced ball to the specified location.

To learn the technique, the bees were trained under one of three conditions: some observed a previously trained bee move the furthest ball to the center to gain reward, others received a “ghost” demonstration — where a magnet hidden underneath the platform was used to move the ball — and a third group received no demonstration, where the bees found the ball already at the center of the platform with reward.

The bees that observed the technique from a live or model demonstrator learned the task more efficiently than those observing a “ghost” demonstration or without demonstration.

“The bees solved the task in a different way than what was demonstrated, suggesting that observer bees did not simply copy what they saw, but improved on it,” said joint lead author Dr. Olli J. Loukola. “This shows an impressive amount of cognitive flexibility, especially for an insect.”

During the demonstrations, the researchers placed three yellow balls at varying distances from the center. The “demonstrator” bees always moved the furthest ball to the center and always from the same spatial location, since they had been trained under conditions where the closer balls were immobile. Untrained bees were given three opportunities to watch a skilled bee perform the task in this manner.

In later tests, when these untrained bees were tested without the presence of a skilled demonstrator, bees moved the closest ball instead of the furthest ball, which they had seen the demonstrator moving. In another experiment, the bees also used a differently colored ball than previously encountered.

“It may be that bumblebees, along with many other animals, have the cognitive capabilities to solve such complex tasks, but will only do so if environmental pressures are applied to necessitate such behaviors,” said Dr. Loukola.

https://www.morningagclips.com/ball-rolling-bees-reveal-complex-learning

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CALGARY HONEY COMPETITION INVITATION – DEADLINE APRIL 1

Welcome Honey Producers!  You are invited to participate in the Aggie Days/Stampede Honey Competition in Calgary, Alberta. Winners not only get their honey exhibited at Aggie Days but they have their sample(s) showcased in our exhibit at the Calgary Stampede which saw over 200,000 visitors last year. So if you are a hobby beekeeper with a hive in the backyard or a commercial producer, this competition is open to all beekeepers (including international).

The honey competition categories include:
Honey Liquid Light
Honey Liquid Dark
Creamed/Crystallized
Taster’s Choice

The winners of each of the 4 categories will receive 2 tickets to the Calgary Stampede but, most importantly, they get bragging rights for a year. We also post the winners’ name on our website.

For entry details, please see the links below.
Brochure & Judging Criteria-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days Honey Show Brochure & judging guidelines.pdf)

Competition Entry Form-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days Honey Show-contest entry form.pdf)

Rules and Regulations-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days-Stampede honey show-rules and regulations.pdf)

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From Dr. Christine Grozinger at POLLINATOR-L list –

RESEARCH JOBS LIST

1. Assistant Professor of Toxicology 9- month, Tenure Track, 75% Research, 25% Teaching – Penn State

All jobs are listed on the Penn State website at
http://ento.psu.edu/pollinators/pollinator-jobs-1

—–

CATCH THE BUZZ

1. The American Honey Tasting Society holds Professional tasting classes. Learn from the best.

The AHTS’s Honey Tasting courses are an intensive educational and interactive introduction into the world of honey. We teach you the methods of sensory analysis used by sommeliers to taste and evaluate honey like an expert. If you are a food professional, chef, shop owner, mixologist, mead maker, beekeeper or simply a honey enthusiast looking to improve your knowledge of honey and your tasting skills you will delight in the AHTS full immersion courses.

Our expert teachers are beekeepers and have been trained by Italian National Registry of Experts in the Sensory Analysis of Honey. You will learn the sensory method for tasting and evaluating honey, the difference between taste and flavor and through engaging in the sensory analysis of the olfactory and gustatory experience, how to recognize and identify the 9 basic aromas and flavor families then how to write detailed tasting notes for each floral source.

For all the information go to: http://www.americanhoneytastingsociety.com/honey-tasting-101

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-american-honey-tasting-society-holds-professional-tasting-classes-learn-best

2. The New Nutrition Label Will Be Different. Take a Look –

• As mandated by the Food and Drug Administration, the latest version of the redesigned Nutrition Facts label was unveiled Monday by RL Food Testing Laboratory, according to a company release emailed to Food Dive. The California-based food labeling company worked with the FDA in developing the new label.

• The biggest changes on the redesigned label include a greater focus on calories and servings per container, updated serving sizes to reflect more realistic portions, information about added sugars, and new recommended daily values for sodium, fiber, vitamin D and potassium.

• Manufacturers with more than $10 million in sales are required to have the new label in place by July 26, 2018. Those with less sales will be required to have the new label by July 26, 2019.

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-new-nutrition-label-will-different-take-look

3. Save the bees? There’s an app for that –

A new app, launching later this year, will allow users to explore land management scenarios, and virtually test how bee-friendly decisions would improve their business.

Let’s say a farmer wanted to plant wildflowers to nurture the bumble bees that pollinate her crops.

Currently, she would have to walk through her fields, assess possible locations, take measurements, spend hours crunching costs and still only guess at the amount of bees and pollination the effort will generate.

Soon, the farmer can do it all on her phone or computer with a mobile app that will calculate the crop productivity and pollination benefits of supporting endangered bees.

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-save-bees-theres-app

4. American Beekeeping Federation Wants Your Help For The Added Sugar Honey Label

Call to Action: FDA is requiring honey labels to list “added sugars.” Speak OUT!

This message is a reminder that on March 6 at 11:59 PM Eastern time the comment period to let the FDA know your opinion about their rule requiring honey labels to list “added sugars.” will be closed.  Whether you are a large or small beekeeper or honey packer, you are urged to submit comments to the docket TODAY or certainly prior to March 6.

As ABF Vice-President Tim May and I have written in previous articles, this FDA rule will lead consumers to believe that honey is adulterated when in fact pure, natural honey contains no added sugars whatsoever.   Consumer surveys, conducted by the National Honey Board, confirm that consumers will indeed be confused by this proposed label language.


—–

CALGARY HONEY COMPETITION INVITATION – DEADLINE APRIL 1

Welcome Honey Producers!  You are invited to participate in the Aggie Days/Stampede Honey Competition in Calgary, Alberta. Winners not only get their honey exhibited at Aggie Days but they have their sample(s) showcased in our exhibit at the Calgary Stampede which saw over 200,000 visitors last year. So if you are a hobby beekeeper with a hive in the backyard or a commercial producer, this competition is open to all beekeepers (including international).

The honey competition categories include:
Honey Liquid Light
Honey Liquid Dark
Creamed/Crystallized
Taster’s Choice

The winners of each of the 4 categories will receive 2 tickets to the Calgary Stampede but, most importantly, they get bragging rights for a year. We also post the winners’ name on our website.

For entry details, please see the links below.
Brochure & Judging Criteria-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days Honey Show Brochure & judging guidelines.pdf)

Competition Entry Form-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days Honey Show-contest entry form.pdf)

Rules and Regulations-2017 (http://www.delta-business.com/CalgaryBeekeepers/Upcoming_Events/2017/AggieDays-HoneyShow/2017 Aggie Days-Stampede honey show-rules and regulations.pdf)

—–

From Dr. Christine Grozinger at POLLINATOR-L list –

RESEARCH JOBS LIST

1. Assistant Professor of Toxicology 9- month, Tenure Track, 75% Research, 25% Teaching – Penn State

All jobs are listed on the Penn State website at
http://ento.psu.edu/pollinators/pollinator-jobs-1

—–

CATCH THE BUZZ

1. The American Honey Tasting Society holds Professional tasting classes. Learn from the best.

The AHTS’s Honey Tasting courses are an intensive educational and interactive introduction into the world of honey. We teach you the methods of sensory analysis used by sommeliers to taste and evaluate honey like an expert. If you are a food professional, chef, shop owner, mixologist, mead maker, beekeeper or simply a honey enthusiast looking to improve your knowledge of honey and your tasting skills you will delight in the AHTS full immersion courses.

Our expert teachers are beekeepers and have been trained by Italian National Registry of Experts in the Sensory Analysis of Honey. You will learn the sensory method for tasting and evaluating honey, the difference between taste and flavor and through engaging in the sensory analysis of the olfactory and gustatory experience, how to recognize and identify the 9 basic aromas and flavor families then how to write detailed tasting notes for each floral source.

For all the information go to: http://www.americanhoneytastingsociety.com/honey-tasting-101

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-american-honey-tasting-society-holds-professional-tasting-classes-learn-best

2. The New Nutrition Label Will Be Different. Take a Look –

• As mandated by the Food and Drug Administration, the latest version of the redesigned Nutrition Facts label was unveiled Monday by RL Food Testing Laboratory, according to a company release emailed to Food Dive. The California-based food labeling company worked with the FDA in developing the new label.

• The biggest changes on the redesigned label include a greater focus on calories and servings per container, updated serving sizes to reflect more realistic portions, information about added sugars, and new recommended daily values for sodium, fiber, vitamin D and potassium.

• Manufacturers with more than $10 million in sales are required to have the new label in place by July 26, 2018. Those with less sales will be required to have the new label by July 26, 2019.

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-new-nutrition-label-will-different-take-look

3. Save the bees? There’s an app for that –

A new app, launching later this year, will allow users to explore land management scenarios, and virtually test how bee-friendly decisions would improve their business.

Let’s say a farmer wanted to plant wildflowers to nurture the bumble bees that pollinate her crops.

Currently, she would have to walk through her fields, assess possible locations, take measurements, spend hours crunching costs and still only guess at the amount of bees and pollination the effort will generate.

Soon, the farmer can do it all on her phone or computer with a mobile app that will calculate the crop productivity and pollination benefits of supporting endangered bees.

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-save-bees-theres-app

4. American Beekeeping Federation Wants Your Help For The Added Sugar Honey Label

Call to Action: FDA is requiring honey labels to list “added sugars.” Speak OUT!

This message is a reminder that on March 6 at 11:59 PM Eastern time the comment period to let the FDA know your opinion about their rule requiring honey labels to list “added sugars.” will be closed.  Whether you are a large or small beekeeper or honey packer, you are urged to submit comments to the docket TODAY or certainly prior to March 6.

As ABF Vice-President Tim May and I have written in previous articles, this FDA rule will lead consumers to believe that honey is adulterated when in fact pure, natural honey contains no added sugars whatsoever.   Consumer surveys, conducted by the National Honey Board, confirm that consumers will indeed be confused by this proposed label language.

http://www.beeculture.com/catch-buzz-american-beekeeping-federation-wants-help-added-sugar-honey-label